Author: angie

Mother to Mother: An Open Letter to My Husband’s Birth Mom

Dear Birth Mom, You or someone you know left your beautiful, healthy baby boy in a phone booth at 7-Eleven on Metropolitan Ave. in Kansas City, KS, sometime before 9 a.m. on June 7, 1972 – presumably after giving birth to him up to 12 hours earlier on June 6, 1972. Here’s your baby at 2 years old. Adorable, right? (Story here: Abandoned 42 years ago, man takes adoption search to social media: How you can help him find his birth family) That baby you had grew up to become my husband, and because of that, you and me? We’ve got...

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Abandoned 42 years ago, man takes adoption search to social media: How you can help him find his birth family

We have decided to take our search to the next level, and we’re doing that by attempting to spread the word further than ever with this photo that Bill posted on his Facebook page tonight.  The message is a basic rundown of the story and reads as follows. Abandoned at Birth: Please Help Me Find My Birth Family.My name is Bill Atkinson. I was born June 6, 1972. I was found wrapped in a towel inside of a phone booth at 7-Eleven on Metropolitan Ave in Kansas City, KS.  He posted the photo along with this message. Friends, I need your help. As many of you know, I was abandoned at birth and found hours old in a telephone booth at 4039 Metropolitan Ave., Kansas City, KS. I was born at approximately 3 am on June 6, 1972. I was found at approximately 9 am the next morning. My wife Angie and I have been searching for years and after a recent DNA test, have located second, third and fourth cousins. My story has been covered by the Kansas City Star and the KC Times, among others, and my wife keeps a blog with our story at http://phoneboothbaby.blogspot.com/ You can help by liking, sharing, tweeting, Instagramming and otherwise passing this post along. To my birth family, I have been blessed with a wonderful loving adoptive family and I don’t want anything from you...

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KC Star Story from 2012: A Review

The following story was originally printed in the Kansas City Star. Since it’s been removed from their site, I’m reprinting it here.  Everyone calls him Bill Atkinson. Before that, he was Stephen Michael Doe. And before that, well, that’s the mystery. He was found, abandoned, in a phone booth, less than a day old and covered in nothing but a blanket. The puzzle of his origins remains unsolved a generation later. Now a 41-year-old husband and father of three, he’s hunting for the family he never knew — the woman he never got to call Mom, the man he never called Dad. But where to start? Short articles in The Star and The Kansas City Times offer only tenuous clues of that June 7, 1972, morning. He was discovered bawling by a woman at a 7-Eleven store at 4039 Metropolitan Ave. in Kansas City, Kan. Doctors figured he was just 12 hours old at the time. One story said he weighed 5 pounds 8 ounces, another had him at 6 and a half pounds. He has no interest in replacing the only family he’s ever known, whom he loves as much as ever. But now that he’s started his own family, he wants answers that might give his children valuable information about medical histories — and his distinct personal history. “I want to know more,” Atkinson said, about “people who look like me, who think like me...

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New clue discovered in the search for the parents of the June 1972 phone booth baby

In  my research, I recently discovered another clue in the search for Bill’s birth parents.  It’s an article that we hadn’t found before, dated June 13, 1972 entitled “Await Word on Abandoned Baby.” In this one, written just 7 days before his adoption was finalized, it states that Kansas law required a waiting period of one year before he could be adopted – UNLESS the birth mother came forward and signed the papers. So that means his birth mother came forward, right? Well, maybe not. See, there’s this one twist: there is no birth mother in the papers. There was a letter releasing him for adoption that was signed by a police officer who, as far as is stated, signed in lieu of the mother, who couldn’t be found. I’d love to hear anyone’s thoughts on this one.  Click to enlarge the photos to read the Kansas City Star’s story.  Our original story is printed below, in case you missed it.  Since we wrote that, we were interviewed by reporter Trey Williams and featured on the front page of the Kansas City Star as well as on websites all over the world.  We have also taken a DNA test and have found some second cousins. If you’re on AncestryDNA, you’ll find us under the username AtkinsonFamilySTL. Bill and I are the two who have tested, so he’ll be the...

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Hubbard Man Reunited with Birth Mother After 25-Year Search

Mother and child union, immediately after birth (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Fred McBride, 47, of Hubbard, described meeting his birth mother and half siblings over the weekend in Buffalo. He started looking for her when his wife, Chrissy, was pregnant with their oldest child, who is now 25. McBride has known all his life that he was adopted. He always wondered what his mother was like and if she ever thought about him. As it turned out, she had been looking for him too. McBride was born in Canada and was adopted in the United States, so he had to have a passport. That passport gave Fred and Chrissy their first piece of the puzzle because his birth name was on the passport: Charles Daryl Black. He was naturalized as a U.S. citizen at the age of 4. After learning he was born in Canada, Fred and Chrissy went to Toronto 18 years ago to see if they could locate his birth mother. The agency that facilitated the adoption gave them non-identifying information such as how old his mother was and where he was born. “His mother was 16 and his father was 18. They were high school sweethearts and her mother told her she was not allowed to bring a baby into the house. So, she sent Patricia away until Fred was born. He was in foster care until...

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